FAQs

GENERAL FAQ’s

  1. Where exactly is the event area?
  2. What happens if it rains?
  3. What are the prizes?
  4. What form of payment do you accept event day?
  5. Where do I park?
  6. How close is the parking area?
  7. Are people dressing in purple?

RUNNER & WALKER FAQ’s

  1. Are pets allowed?
  2. Are strollers & joggers allowed?
  3. What is the route like?

CYCLIST FAQ’s

  1. Do I need to wear a helmet?
  2. What about lightning once we’re out on the ride?
  3. Can I tow a child trailer on the ride?
  4. Do I need to be able to change my own flat tires?
  5. Do I need to take food and water with me?
  6. Are there Rest Stops on the route?
  7. What are the roads like?
  8. Which route do you recommend for families and/or someone who may be newer to cycling?
  9. What do I do if I feel like I can’t finish the ride?
  10. What if I have an emergency or need to call for assistance?
  11. How do I get help or signal for help?
  12. How will I know where I’m going?
  13. Where do I get cue sheets?
  14. Should I take my cell phone with me?
  15. How hard is the 42 mile route?
  16. What is the Optional Hill Challenge like?
  17. What if I don’t think I can make the climb on the Hill Challenge?
  18. How does the King of the Mountain (KOM) and Queen of the Mountain (QOM) work on the Hill Challenge?
  19. I’ve never ridden on a group ride…what do I need to know?
  20. What is group riding etiquette?

GENERAL FAQ’s

Where exactly is the event area?
The main event area is the new bandshell in Quakertown’s Krupp Park. This is at the end of N. 4th Street, just past the James A. Michener branch of the Bucks County Library. The start and finish lines are in the same area. You can’t miss it.

What happens if it rains?
This is a rain-or-shine event! Dress accordingly! Obviously, if there’s lightning, we’ll delay the start until the storm passes.

What are the prizes?
You’ll find out event day. Maybe we’ll drop some hints before the event. Then again, maybe not. ☺ Regardless, there will be prizes for runners and King and Queen of the Mountain for cyclists. Plus, you’ll get “stuff” in your goodie bag.

What forms of payment do you accept event day?
We’ll accept cash, personal check and credit card for any event day purchases. The only thing that won’t work is an IOU.

Where do I park?
All parking will be at the lots on the corner of 4th & Mill Streets in Quakertown. Entrance to the main lot is on 4th Street immediately south of the intersection of 4th & Mill. Volunteers will be there to direct you.

How close is the parking area?
Close. Just a walk across Mill Street and you’ll see us. There will be traffic control at the intersection of 4th & Mill to make sure everyone gets back and forth safely. No worries there.

Are people dressing in purple?
You bet! Both participants and volunteers! Purple is the color for pancreatic cancer, so get your purple on! Be as silly as you dare with your purple-related garb.

RUNNER & WALKER FAQ’s

Are pets allowed?
Yes. The park is pet-friendly, and so are we. But pets must be leashed and both pets and owners must be well-behaved. For owners, that means being considerate of others and making sure you pick up after your pet. For the run, you’ll need to be a little more mindful of being courteous than you will for the walk. Unless you and Fido are ‘bone-a-fide’ (little pun there) speedsters, you may want to consider running more towards the rear.

Are strollers and joggers allowed?
Absolutely. This is a completely family-friendly event. Again, just remember to be courteous; especially on the park path where it narrows down in a few places.

What is the route like?
For runners and walkers alike, the route is the same. The first mile will be on quiet streets before connecting to the park path that’s flat and paved with both open and shaded sections. Runners will be directed to run on the streets, which will be blocked, while walkers will be directed to use the sidewalks so that the streets can be opened quicker. Don’t forget your sunscreen!

CYCLIST FAQ’S

Do I need to wear a helmet?
Absolutely. You will NOT be allowed to participate without a helmet.

What about lightning once we’re out on the ride?
Once the ride is underway, if an electrical storm arrives we ask that you get off the road and find shelter until the storm passes. Remaining on the road puts you at risk for both lightning strikes and vehicle collision due to diminished visibility. The League of American Bicyclists suggests the following if you encounter electrical storms while out on a ride:

  • Look for safe shelter (houses, stores, large barns, underpasses, etc.) as soon as you hear thunder
  • Lower your elevation as much as possible (move from hilltops to valleys or ravines)
  • Get off and away from your bike quickly if you feel your skin tingle or your hair stand on end. Minimize your ground contact and make yourself the smallest target possible by squatting low to the ground on the balls of your feet and place your hands on your knees with your head between them.
  • AVOID – high spots and finding ‘shelter’ in small sheds or under trees; especially isolated trees.

Can I tow a child trailer on the ride?
For the 24 mile ride, if you think you’ve got the legs to do it, sure. The 24 mile route has gentle rollers and only 560’ of climb, but a few of those rollers will take a little effort if you’re pulling a trailer. The 42 mile ride, however, is unsuitable for a trailer due to the climbs; especially if you decide to do the optional hill challenge.

Do I need to be able to change my own flat tires?
No, we’ll have SAG vehicles traveling the route to help with flats and minor repairs. But the ability to change your own flat will prevent you from having to wait for assistance. Regardless of whether you can change a flat yourself, we recommend carrying a patch kit, pump or inflator, set of tire levers and an extra tube. This way you have the supplies if someone stops to help you.

Do I need to take food and water with me?
We suggest you take two full bottles of water and an easy to eat snack. We’ll have water and snacks at the event area if you forget to bring something from home. Though we will have bottled water available, we prefer you bring reusable water bottles. We want to be an environmentally low-impact event.

Are there Rest Stops on the route?
Yes. In addition to the refreshments tent at the start, there are two rest stops on the route. One around mile 13 which is accessible to both routes (24 & 42), and another rest stop around mile 22 of the 42 mile route. The 42 milers will again pass the first stop, which will now be around their mile 30, so they will have an opportunity for a total of three stops along the route. Rest stops will have water, fruit, snacks and bathroom (porta-potty).

What are the roads like?
The scenic roads are mostly wooded, rural and winding with gentle rollers. The roads are not heavily traveled. The few locations where the route will cross a moderately traveled road, we’ll have Fire Police stationed to make the crossings safe and easy. Your safety and enjoyment are of paramount importance.

Which route do you recommend for families and/or someone who may be relatively new to cycling?
The 24 mile route. The 42 mile route is a bit long and contains a climb, even if you don’t do the optional hill challenge.

What do I do if I feel like I can’t finish the ride?
No worries. We’ll have monitor and SAG vehicles traveling the route in communication with event coordinator(s). Either they’ll be able to bring you and your bike back to the event area, or they’ll contact another SAG vehicle to get you back.

What if I have an emergency or need to call for assistance?
If it’s a real emergency, dial 911. If you need roadside assistance or a lift back to the event area, call the SAG number on your cue sheets.

How do I get help or signal for help?
Again, if it’s an emergency, dial 911. For technical help or a lift back, call the SAG number on the cue sheet. If you need help, get off to the side of the road in a safe spot and turn your bike upside down. That’s the universal signal for any passing SAG or monitor vehicles that you need help.

How will I know where I’m going?
Cue sheets are available and the route will be well-marked. There will be spray-painted arrows on the roadway telling you which way to go, along with directional yard signs for certain intersections. We’ll also post volunteer Course Marshalls at critical intersections to keep you headed in the right direction.

Where do I get cue sheets?
You can download them from the website. We’ll also have copies available at the registration tent on event day.

Should I take my cell phone with me?
It’s always a good idea to take your cell phone along with you in case of emergencies. We suggest you put your cell phone in a waterproof case or a sandwich bag for moisture protection.

How hard is the 42 mile route?
The 42 mile route without the optional hill challenge has one healthy, but doable climb. Most importantly, we want you to enjoy the ride, so don’t overdo it. Walk if you feel like you want to or need to.

What is the optional Hill Challenge like?
If you do the optional hill challenge, you’re adding a Category 5 climb up what we locals have long called, ‘Ghost Mountain’. Category 5 climbs are the easiest of all rated climbs. But remember, it’s still a climb … and one that merits a rating. We want you to enjoy the ride, so don’t overdo it. Walk if you need to.

What if I don’t think I can make the climb on the Hill Challenge?
Simple, walk it. You’re out there for a good cause and we want you to enjoy it. Walkers and slower climbers must stay to the right on these climbs however. There will be some folks who will be climbing fast and hard competing for the King or Queen of the Mountain. We don’t want to push them too far out in the traffic lane. So, if you’re walking, stay to the extreme right or on the shoulder. If you’re climbing slowly stay as far right as you can. Give those serious climbers some room and enjoy the show!

How does the King of the Mountain (KOM)/Queen of the Mountain (QOM) competition work?
These are playful titles traditionally given to the best “climber’ on uphill segments and we plan on having a little fun with our own version of this if you take the optional Hill Challenge. If you’re a Strava (www.strava.com) you’ll find a category 5 climb segment on the Hill Challenge.

  • Township Road-Corrected (around mile 24 going up ‘Ghost Mountain’ ) – there may be a cheering section!
    The approach to this segment, along with the start and end of the segment, will be well-marked. The male and female with the lowest time on this uphill segment will win our King and Queen of the Mountain! And in keeping with cycling customs (or at least our version of it), they will be recognized with a purple polka dot Amy’s Ride/Run/Walk t-shirt. We do want to remind everyone this cycling event is a ride, NOT a race. But there’s no harm in a little spirited fun for those interested. To participate, you’ll need to download and use the STRAVA app on your ride.

I’ve never ridden on a group ride, what do I need to know?
When riding with a group, all of the same traffic rules and good riding habits apply as if you were riding alone or with one other person. But because you’re in a group with other riders close by, the following become even more important:

  • Be Predictable
    Ride in a straight line, don’t swerve around, signal your intentions, etc. You’ll have other riders close by and you’ll help everyone be safer if you ride predictably.
  • Think Ahead
    Look ahead and anticipate what other motorists and cyclists might do. Look at the route and road conditions ahead so that you never have to brake suddenly or swerve at the last moment.
  • Ride Ready
    Be ready to ride. Have your tires pumped up properly, your brakes and gears adjusted and your chain lubricated. If it’s not your bike, make sure your seat and handlebar heights are adjusted for you.

What is group riding etiquette?
Riding in groups is AWESOME! But the key to safe and enjoyable group riding is to ride predictably. Think ahead and be considerate with braking and signaling. Beyond that, there are a number of hand signals and verbal communications commonly practiced by folks who ride in groups to maximize the safety and enjoyment. Don’t feel intimidated if you find yourself behind individuals who practice these verbal and visual signals considered to be good etiquette. You’ll find the communication very helpful and you’ll catch on quickly. A few easy things that make big differences:

  • When slowing or stopping with others riding close behind you, let them know by calling out ‘slowing’ or ‘stopping’.
  • Always use hand signals for your turns
  • Call or point to road hazards like debris or potholes to warn others riding close behind you. If they’re aside of or behind you, they may not see it until too late.